Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Summer 6-15-2013

Abstract

This paper builds on the work carried out by OEAS in China, which established the framework of ocean economy accounting in China. It also demonstrates how it is possible to compile ocean economy data, from the existing government databases in China. The Chinese ocean economy was divided into two separate parts for the purpose of the analysis presented; the ocean industry and ocean-related industry. Data was collected for 12 major ocean industries. Using a similar methodology to that developed in previous international studies, it was found that the major ocean industries produced US$239.09 billion in value added output in 2010 and accounted for 4.03% of China’s national GDP. The major ocean industries were found to employ 9,253,000 individuals. This analysis also found that coastal tourism, marine communication and transportation industry and the marine fishing industry dominate in China’s ocean economy. A time series analysis for the period 2001 to 2010 found that the Chinese ocean economy follows a very similar growth path to that of the national economy. It would appear from the analysis however that given the international nature of the activities in the ocean economy, the major ocean industries demonstrate a higher level of vulnerability in terms of the impact of unexpected shocks on the economy.

While this paper has undertaken an analysis of the Chinese Ocean economy, defining and quantifying the Coastal economy in China is an area worthy of further research. In this case the Chinese Coastal economy could be defined as all activity which takes place in a predefined coastal area and would include all economic activity in the coastal region; however those areas and regions are defined6. This task is all the more relevant given the five ocean economic development zones that have been established in a number of China’s coastal provinces. Along with the ocean economy information described in this paper such coastal economy statistics would allow policy makers, planners and government to make more informed coastal planning and marine environment management decisions.

This paper builds on the work carried out by OEAS in China, which established the framework of ocean economy accounting in China. It also demonstrates how it is possible to compile ocean economy data, from the existing government databases in China. The Chinese ocean economy was divided into two separate parts for the purpose of the analysis presented; the ocean industry and ocean-related industry. Data was collected for 12 major ocean industries. Using a similar methodology to that developed in previous international studies, it was found that the major ocean industries produced US$239.09 billion in value added output in 2010 and accounted for 4.03% of China’s national GDP. The major ocean industries were found to employ 9,253,000 individuals. This analysis also found that coastal tourism, marine communication and transportation industry and the marine fishing industry dominate in China’s ocean economy. A time series analysis for the period 2001 to 2010 found that the Chinese ocean economy follows a very similar growth path to that of the national economy. It would appear from the analysis however that given the international nature of the activities in the ocean economy, the major ocean industries demonstrate a higher level of vulnerability in terms of the impact of unexpected shocks on the economy.

While this paper has undertaken an analysis of the Chinese Ocean economy, defining and quantifying the Coastal economy in China is an area worthy of further research. In this case the Chinese Coastal economy could be defined as all activity which takes place in a predefined coastal area and would include all economic activity in the coastal region; however those areas and regions are defined6. This task is all the more relevant given the five ocean economic development zones that have been established in a number of China’s coastal provinces. Along with the ocean economy information described in this paper such coastal economy statistics would allow policy makers, planners and government to make more informed coastal planning and marine environment management decisions.